New Top-Loading Sulfuric Acid Method Reduces Spills and Ruptures at Paper Mill - Rain for Rent New Top-Loading Sulfuric Acid Method Reduces Spills and Ruptures at Paper Mill - Rain For Rent

Quote Request

For immediate assistance,
call 800 742 7246

New Top-Loading Sulfuric Acid Method Reduces Spills and Ruptures at Paper Mill

Paper mill deploys Rain for Rent's retrofitted poly tanks to reduce risk of spills and tank ruptures during filling process.

BACKGROUND

A large paper mill in Louisiana was servicing their permanent sulfuric acid tanks on site and needed to bring in temporary polyethylene tanks to continue operating. They were concerned with the leak potential during the traditional bottom filling process when liquid bulk transport trucks purge their lines with nitrogen gas.  Line connection leaks and the possibility of tank splits at the knuckle radius were a significant concern for the mill.

OUTCOME

By working with Rain for Rent on a solution, they retrofitted the poly tanks to allow for top loading with additional venting. The heavy weight of sulfuric acid no longer presses on the fittings and allows the nitrogen gas to easily escape from the tank without leaking from the fittings or rupturing the tank.

HIGHLIGHTS

Rain for Rent worked with the customer to design a system that included hard piping PVC to minimize leak potential. With pre-measured, pre-fitted piping and pre-planned tank positioning, the final installation in the mill went smoothly.

CUSTOMER FEEDBACK

The customer utilized the tanks on site for three months and had no leaks or spills. The Production Leader at the mill plans to use Rain for Rent again in the future noting that “Everything went very smoothly especially for the first time utilizing this brand new top loading solution.”  He said that he could count on Rain for Rent to be on site, managing the installation and disassembly of the system to ensure it went as planned.

  1. Previous Case

    Food processing bypass becomes integral system
  2. Next Case

    Semiconductor plant saves millions with bypasses